Google+

Location

Buying Guide: 10 best mirrorless cameras of 2015

Best mirrorless compact system cameraIn the old days, if you were serious about photography you bought a digital SLR. But now CSCs (compact system cameras) offer the advantages of a DSLR, including a big sensor, interchangeable lenses and advanced controls, but in a smaller, lighter body without the mirror mechanism – hency why they're also called mirrorless cameras.But mirrorless cameras (compact system cameras) come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. Some look like DSLRs, some look like supersized compact cameras. Some have viewfinders and some don't. The fact is that we're all looking for slightly different things, so we've ranked the 10 best compact system cameras you can buy right now based not just on specs, handling and performance, but size, simplicity and value for money too. 1. Olympus OM-D E-M10 IIThe brilliant E-M10 II ticks boxes you probably didn't even know aboutSensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16.1Mp | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch tilting display, 1,037,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8.5fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II deals Compact size, lenses too Excellent viewfinder Smaller sensor than some Pricier than original E-M10We loved the original E-M10 for its size, versatility and value for money, but the E-M10 II adds features that take it to another level. The old camera's 3-axis image stabilization system has been uprated to the 5-axis system in Olympus's more advanced OM-D cameras, the viewfinder resolution has been practically doubled and the continuous shooting speed, already impressive at 8fps, creeps up to 8.5fps. Some will criticise the smaller Micro Four Thirds sensor format (roughly half the area of APS-C) but the effect on image quality is minor and it means that the lenses are as compact and lightweight as the camera itself. It's small, but it's no toy – the E-M10 II is a properly powerful camera.Read the full review: Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II 2. Sony A7 IIFull-frame DSLR-style stunner with 5-axis stabilization built inSensor size: Full frame | Resolution: 24.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch, 1,228,800 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 5fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Sony Alpha A7 II deals Full frame image quality Size and handling Lenses can be bulky Upstaged somewhat by new A7R IIThe A7 II doesn't have the highest-resolution sensor in the A7 range – that's the 42.5Mp A7R II – but its full-frame sensor still has 24 million pixels and, now, built-in stabilization. It's more expensive than the A7 it replaces, but although our lab tests show it has no clear performance advantage over its best APS-C rivals, the Fuji X-T1 and Samsung NX1, the A7 II's full-frame sensor brings a shallower depth of field and a pictorial 'depth' to stills and video that's harder to achieve in a smaller format. The A7 II is an important step in the evolution of full-frame compact system cameras and is supported by a growing collection of pro-quality lenses.Read the full review: Sony Alpha A7 II 3. Fuji X-T10The X-T10 upstages the X-T1 with a small drop in features but a big drop in priceSensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 16.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch, 920,800 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Fuji X-T10 deals Excellent build and design Value for money High ISOs are JPEG only Lacks X-T1's weatherproofingAt first sight the X-T10 looks like a lower-cost alternative to the X-T1, and you might be expecting a whole bunch of compromises as a result. In fact, though, the X-T10 uses the same sensor and Fuji's latest AF technology, which the X-T1 needs a firmware update to match. The X-T10 has a slightly smaller viewfinder image and simplified external controls which don't match the retro appeal of the X-T1's, but apart from that it's hard to see any major benefit to the X-T1 that could justify the big price difference. We love the compact DSLR-style body, the superb Fuji image quality and film simulation modes, and Fuji's growing range of premium lenses.Read the full review: Fuji X-T10 4. Fuji X-T1Classic handling, beautiful images – the X-T1 doesn't put a foot wrongSensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 16.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch tilting display, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Fuji X-T1 deals Classic controls Rugged build Advanced filters JPEG only Expensive compared to X-T10Not so long back the X-T1 was our favourite compact system camera, but things change quickly in the world of cameras, and it's been pushed out of the top spot. Price has proved the X-T1's main enemy – it's a great camera, but the newer Fuji X-T10 is almost as great and much cheaper. The Olympus E-M10 II has come along with its brilliant blend of size, features and value, and competitive pricing means the Sony A7 II is now very good value for those who value performance above all else. The X-T1's external manual controls for shutter speed, lens aperture and ISO setting are still a joy to use and we love the results from its X-Trans sensor, but its rivals are just getting stronger.Read the full review: Fuji X-T1 5. Olympus OM-D E-M5 IIAmazing features, impressive results, inspired thinking… but not cheapSensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16.1MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch articulating display, 1,037,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 10fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II deals Innovative 40M high-res mode Effective 5-axis stabilization Some fiddly and complex controls Holding its price a bit too wellThe E-M5 II is another technological tour-de-force from Olympus, with a 40Mp High Res mode that produces detail far beyond the sensor's native resolution (though only with static subjects), 5-axis image stabilization for both stills and movies (so it's great for 'run-and-gun' style videography), a fully-articulating touch-screen display and some clever and exciting low-light exposure modes. It's also small and perfectly formed – yet, for an enthusiasts' camera it's not cheap, and the controls can be baffling. It's a similar price to the Fuji X-T1 and faces a similar problem – it's desirable enough, but there's a newer, much cheaper camera in the range (the OM-D E-M10 II) that makes you question the price.Read the full review: Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II 6. Panasonic GH4Is it a stills camera or a 4K video camera? The GH4 is brilliant but conflictedSensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16.1MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch tilting screen, 1,036,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 12fps | Maximum video resolution: 4KSee more Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 deals 4K video and 14fps continuous shooting Metal chassis Some fiddly and complex controls Pro build quality and 200,000-shot shutter lifeThe GH4 is a terrific, ground-breaking camera and its 4K video capabilities are becoming legendary amongst professional film-makers. It's also a very good stills camera capable of shooting top-quality 16Mp images at up to 12 frames per second. You can even extract really good 8MP stills from 4K video shot at 30fps. But all this processing power makes the GH4 expensive, so unless shooting high-speed action stills and video is your speciality, you could be paying for power you won't use. It's a firm favourite amongst 4K film-makers and early adopters, however, and while prices have fallen since its launch in 2014, its reputation just seems to keep on growing.Read the full review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 7. Panasonic G7If you like the GH4's tech but not its price, try the new G7Sensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 16MP | Viewfinder: Electronic | Monitor: 3-inch articulating screen, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Maximum video resolution: 4KSee more Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 deals Excellent OLED viewfinder 4K video and stills mode Two-year-old sensor Plasticky buildPanasonic's D-SLR-style G-series cameras are easily overlooked, as the company tends to put its latest technology in its smaller, rectangular GX-series cameras – the new GX8 is the first to use Panasonic's new 20Mp Micro Four Thirds sensor. Nevertheless, they offer a good blend of features, technology, practicality and value. Indeed, the G7 is a pretty good stills camera for the money, but it goes a whole step further, adding in Panasonic's 4K movie capability and the option of grabbing 8Mp stills at a rate of 30fps. Interestingly, though, Panasonic has kept to its 'old' 16Mp sensor for this model, reserving its latest 20Mp sensor for the GX8. And while the G7 looks great on paper, its plasticky construction is a disappointment.Read the full review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 8. Sony A6000Sony's top box-shape CSC has an electronic viewfinder and super-fast AFSensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 24.3MP | Viewfinder: EVF | Monitor: 3-inch tilting screen, 921,600 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 11fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Sony Alpha 6000 deals Great electronic viewfinder Fast and sophisticated AF Frustrating AF set process No touchscreenThe A6000 is Sony's top APC-S compact system camera and has a 'box' design rather than the D-SLR style of the E-M10 and other enthusiast-orientated compact system cameras. It has an electronic viewfinder, though, mounted in the top corner and some very impressive specs, including a hybrid AF system claimed by Sony to be the fastest in the world when it was launched (February 2014), a 24-megapixel sensor and 11fps continuous shooting. But although the body is compact, the Sony E-mount lenses can be bulky, which affects the overall balance. On the other hand, the A6000 is now on sale at super-competitive prices – this is a high-end compact system camera at an entry-level price and that guarantees it a place in our list.Read the full review: Sony Alpha 6000 9. Panasonic GX8Panasonic's flagship CSC has a brand new sensor, but it's priceySensor size: Micro Four Thirds | Resolution: 20.3MP | Viewfinder: Tilting EVF | Monitor: 3-inch tilting screen, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8fps | Maximum video resolution: 4KSee more Panasonic GX8 deals New 20Mp sensor Mag-alloy build, dust and splash-proof Larger than the old GX7 Expensive at launchPanasonic's compact system camera range is pretty confusing. You might expect its DSLR-style G-series cameras to get the best and latest tech, but actually it's the the box-shaped GX8 that's the first to benefit from Panasonic's new 20Mp Micro Four Thirds sensor – this has performed really well in our lab tests, putting it on the same level as a good DSLR. The GX8 also comes with 4K video and the ability to grab 8Mp stills from it (it's like continuous shooting at 30fsp). The rear screen is tilting and so, unusually, is the electronic viewfinder eyepiece. It's a very good camera, but the price is a sticking point, and the Sony A6000 (above) gives you more for your money.Read the full review: Panasonic GX8 10. Fuji X-M1Decent entry-level CSC made more attractive by falling pricesSensor size: APS-C | Resolution: 16.3MP | Viewfinder: No | Monitor: 3-inch tilting display, 921,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 5.6fps | Maximum video resolution: 1080pSee more Fuji X-M1 deals Excellent X-Trans sensor Smart retro styling No viewfinder Limited digital filtersThis is the only camera on our list without a viewfinder, and that's because we think they are a near-necessity on any serious camera. However, you can't ignore the XM-1's current rock-bottom price, and you do get a lot for your money. This is the cheapest route into Fuji's X-mount camera system and it uses the same 16Mp X-Trans sensor as the Fuji X-T1 and X-T10. It's also rather neat, with appealing retro styling. The bundled 16-50mm kit lens isn't the best and adds a lot of bulk, but at this price you can forgive a lot. It's quite possible that a Fuji X-M1 replacement is on the way, which could explain the falling prices, so if you like the price it might be wise to get one while you can.Read the full review: Fuji X-M1 What camera should I buy?Best cameraBest DSLR

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel
The workplace – the next major connected ecosystem

Introduction Businesses today are busy automating, embracing big data and trying to figure out what the Internet of Things means for them, but what about the workplace? With 'bring your own device' (BYOD) firmly embedded, smart devices and wearables are about to fuel a new focus on smart, intuitive digital services for employees.Welcome to the office, the next major connected ecosystem, and we're going to explore this brave new world over the following slides…How to choose an office printerSmart apps at work The first phase of the digitisation of the office is about bringing together existing technologies as smart apps. "We designed a system for a bank in Istanbul that helped the staff plan their day and interact with customers," says Mark Curtis, co-founder and chief client officer at design and innovation consultancy firm Fjord, who describes how the dashboard collates information on meetings, targets and also includes internal communications."We built into the system live mapping linked to a live calendar, which automatically detects where the next meeting is, gives traffic alerts, and tells them when to leave – it's an early and relatively simple example of what will soon be possible." Such data-harvesting apps are possible now, though offices and workplaces are yet to see the emergence of an iconic smart device, such as Nest or Philips Hue smart bulbs in the world of smart homes. However, Curtis says that any technology that takes things off the 'thinking list' is potentially a game-changer. Wearable cameras and mobile workers Many of the changes we're on the cusp of will mostly benefit those working away from the office. "The Ca7ch Lightbox is a wearable camera that could change the lives of a lot of field workers," says Curtis, who stresses the role technology has already played in creating a mobilised, independent workforce. "Equipping that workforce with wearable cameras is the kind of thing that has the potential to create different ways of managing people." One of the biggest issues in the hotel industry is how to get the maximum efficiency from cleaning staff, which is currently hampered by the constant and unpredictable movement of guests. "You can do a lot with wrist wearables," says Curtis, who recommends a smartwatch for this particular task. "It's all about managing productivity, but there's a two-way flow," he says of technology that can track the movements of staff, such as Bluetooth beacons."It's difficult to imagine that this isn't going to drive out a great deal of efficiency, but changes like this need to be managed with care. Systems need to be designed with humans in mind – they need to involve staff." Orwellian overtones Employers being able to track staff around a workplace has Orwellian overtones, so it will only take-off if staff get big benefits. "When an employee arrives in a location, an app could automatically log them in," says Mike Crooks, Head of Innovation, Mubaloo Innovation Lab."The app would know who the user is, it would then trigger the right contextual information, based on who they are and what they need," adds Crooks. "This could then prompt them to follow the right process for their job. The app would give them the right information, helping to assist them and possibly navigate them elsewhere."Sit down at your desk and you could be sensed, and perhaps automatically logged-in to a system hands-free. "We will see an increasing number of context-aware applications where the internet will combine data from many different data sources," says Martin Gunnarsson, Director Product Strategies at IFS Labs, who gives the example of a field service engineer who needs to service power grid equipment, for whom data can be presented in a much more automated way."The GPS can set my location and provide asset information as to where I'm standing," he notes. Navigating offices - and tracking colleagues There is another dimension to staff being tracked that could socialise work in clever ways. "We have a client who runs a co-working space called The Factory in Berlin, which has been beacon-ised," says Trevor Longino, Head of PR and Marketing at beacon manufacturer Kontakt.io. "Say I'm at the office to meet Sean and I don't know where he is. With beacons installed, I can see if he's in the building, where he is, and be guided through the office to exactly where he is."You could even receive an alert when someone arrives at the office, if they want to make themselves 'seen' by the beacons. It would also be possible for an office worker to send a message to everyone sitting near them, perhaps to find out if anyone is going for lunch.Will Google Glass make a comeback? A massive failure in the mainstream they may have been, but smart glasses like Google Glass have a huge future in the workplace. "Consumers don't yet see the value in having a screen constantly in your view when out and about," says Gunnarsson. "On the flipside, I have a strong belief in the success of the workplace-centric Google Glass."Google recently announced that its 'Glass at Work Certified Partners' are enterprise developers including APX, Augmedix, Crowdoptic, GuidiGO and Wearable Intelligence, which should mean hands-free, real-time, context-aware apps for business. IFS Labs has developed a showcase on Google Glass where a technician can receive work instructions via images in the eyepiece, with audio talking them through actions, such as performing a service on a coffee machine. The maintenance worker can ditch the manuals. "In the future, augmented reality and holograms will allow users to have information presented in a 3D perspective, which will really change and adapt the way we work," says Gunnarsson. Google Glass may lack acceptability as a wearable device in public, but the augmentation technology at its core will be extremely helpful in some professions."We shouldn't write-off Google Glass, it's very broad-minded," says Curtis. "If you look at the advantages of having a feed of data to your eyes, and the layer of voice control that can be applied, it has huge potential as a workforce-enabler for engineers or anyone doing skilled work with small or large objects – and that includes surgeons – who could have their knowledge-base significantly improved by Google Glass." Making meetings more productive How about a self-regulating, self-reliant meeting room? "We'll see cheap sensors attached to rooms, equipment, and supplies," says Curtis of creeping office digitisation, "and it could all come together to make meeting more effective." A wearable or phone can be used to unlock a meeting room, of course, but there's much more to it than that. If a system knows where all the people who are coming to a meeting are, who's going to be late, and it can order the correct equipment needed for a meeting, the time efficiency savings are potentially huge. "Beacons are also being used to help identify when meeting rooms are available, which is especially useful if a room has been booked for over an hour, yet only used for 20 minutes," says Crooks. The opposite works, too – if a meeting is running over time and encroaching on a time when the room is booked, everyone in the meeting room can receive a message telling them to vacate in, say, the next five minutes. "All offices struggle with unproductive meetings, and using technology to improve their efficiency will provide a route to persuading staff that wearing wearables has a benefit," says Curtis. "This technology will be massive in the next two or three years."

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel
Protestors in Lebanon demand action for the stinking piles of trash that are filling streets

Activists staged a sit-in at a government building in Lebanon's capital city of Beirut for several hours on Tuesday before riot police stormed the Environment Ministry and dragged them out. The protesters are demanding the resignation of the Environment Minister over a waste management crisis in the city that has left stinking heaps of garbage piling up on streets for weeks See also: Syrian refugee children work to live in Lebanon Beirut's largest landfill was closed in July after reaching capacity, and the government has yet to come up with a solution on what to do with the growing piles of trash Read more...More about Protests, Us World, and Lebanon

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel
Rejoice: McDonald's all-day breakfast is coming

It's finally happening. After months of will-they-won't-they, McDonald's announced Tuesday that the chain will offer all-day breakfast. According to an announcement made on the brand's Twitter account, this new service begins Oct. 6. See also: The McDonald's Secret Menu: Stop dreaming, start ordering .@_johnlee_ You open on 10/6? Asking for a McMuffin. Hoping to do lunch, but available all day#AllDayBreakfast pic.twitter.com/CePWF5aXf8 — McDonald's (@McDonalds) September 1, 2015 The retailer cleverly announced the news in response to old requests on Twitter for an all-day-breakfast service: Read more... More about Business, Mcdonalds, Pics, Lifestyle, and Watercooler

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel
7-year-old with cancer has an inspiring duet with his favorite singer

September marks Pediatric Cancer Awareness month, and one 7-year-old boy is showing everyone how strong he can be. Jeremiah Succar, a patient with a rare form of brain and spinal cancer at the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, is a big fan of singer/songwriter Rachel Platten. He finally got his wish to finally meet his idol when she visited the hospital in Los Angeles. See also: Woman shares her incredible recovery story via selfies on Imgur It’s Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and this video says it all. CHLA patient, Jeremiah, has a lot of heart and a lot of fight—thanks in part to his #FightSong! He surprised singer/songwriter Rachel Platten by knowing the lyrics to her hit single by heart. #ccamLearn more about Jeremiah's story: bit.ly/fightsong-blog Posted by Children's Hospital Los Angeles on Tuesday, September 1, 2015 Read more... More about Viral Videos, Health, Videos, Kids, and Watercooler

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel
The Ashley Madison hack points a theologian toward grace

(RNS) The Ashley Madison hack -- the public release of emails of wannabe adulterers -- has now ensnared a theologian with a famous name in some Christian circles. The post The Ashley Madison hack points a theologian toward grace appeared first on Religion News Service.

1 0 0 0
Login to proceed

Cancel

Ok Cancel


Cancel
Hours
Cancel