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And that's a wrap...

The Guardian Unlimited Music team is home or on its way home. For a round-up of the weekend, visit our Glastonbury special report. For all the reviews from this weekend - the Who and the Kaiser Chiefs have been added, with more to come - click here. And for all the music blog posts - new ones by Jack Penate and the Rakes have been added - visit the music blog.Oh, and here's editor Alan Rusbridger's Flickr set of the National Youth Orchestra. Everyone pitches in during Glastonbury here. Continue reading...

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Have you tasted comedy gold?

'Garlic bread - it's the future, I've tasted it' ... Peter Kay performing as Brian Potter. Photograph: PA As previously discussed, comedy analysis is rarely a good idea, writes James Anthony. Deconstructing jokes and analysing their components is the quickest way to kill the humour.UKTV Gold, a digital channel whose fare is primarily shows that Auntie Beeb has deemed unfit to repeat, disagrees. Who are we to argue with the company responsible for revisiting upon us the abject misery of My Family - a show so dire, its funniest character now tries to peddle us a British telecommunications company by pairing its brand image with revolting middle class smugness? Continue reading...

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Why go out?

The friday television pome by me, annaF is for "phew it is Friday once more" for R is for rich wads of weekend in store I is for I've got a cold and am grumpy but D: doing nothing's the plan, or nothing 'part from A, which is 'actively courting the tellybox' Y not? Watch TV in pyjamas. And maybesocks. Continue reading...

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To scan or not to scan?

The University of Michigan used to keep its library under lock and key. Students were alllowed in once a week, but needed the librarian's permission before they could touch a book. Now, things are different. The university has given Google co-founder Larry Page (a Michigan alumnus) permission to digitise every one of its 7m volumes, making them available through the Google Book Search to anyone in the world with an internet connection. The Bodleian Library: no longer just for Oxford students. Photograph: Martin Argles In his World Book Day address to the Guardian Review forum, Bloomsbury's chief executive, Nigel Newton, protested vigorously against "Google's literary land-grab": its plans to scan books and make them freely available on its Book Search. Victor Keegan explains why, on the contrary, he believes readers and publishers will benefit from Google's activitiesThe University of Michigan used to keep its library under lock and key. Students were alllowed in once a week, but needed the librarian's permission before they could touch a book. Now, things are different. The university has given Google co-founder Larry Page (a Michigan alumnus) permission to digitise every one of its 7m volumes, making them available through the Google Book Search to anyone in the world with an internet connection. Other institutions including Oxford University's Bodleian Library and the Library of Congress are also involved in the exercise which has mind-boggling implications for access to knowledge for everyone from Alaska to deepest Africa. Continue reading...

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Luck out

With the Baftas now over, our resident statisticians have finally completed the painstaking task of preparing our patent-pending Oscars predictor for its final edition. So who does the predictor predict? Somewhat predictably, it's those chaps in chaps who look a dead cert to slope off into the Californian sunset, shiny statuettes glinting in their saddlebags, writes Guy Dammann.With the Baftas now over, our resident statisticians have finally completed the painstaking task of preparing our patent-pending Oscars predictor for its final edition. So who does the predictor predict? Somewhat predictably, it's those chaps in chaps who look a dead cert to slope off into the Californian sunset, shiny statuettes glinting in their saddlebags, writes Guy Dammann.Our predictor gives the celebrated cowboy romance a solid six-and-a-half points, leaving mountains to climb for its nearest rival, Crash, which has a modest two points. Of course there's always room for the provisory "don't count your chickens", but the most appropriate thing to count now would seem to be sheep, so smooth and, well, featureless looks the film's gongland path, with all evidence suggesting that the voting herd have been put under the film world's equivalent of a three-line whip. Continue reading...

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Brave new works

Bored of Orwell? Which authors would you add to school reading lists? Photograph: Martin Argles If there's one thing guaranteed to have the great British public spluttering over their cornflakes, it's the suggestion that something that falls under the nebulous umbrella of "national heritage" is for the chop. Witness the brouhaha over the scrapping of Radio 4's UK theme tune earlier this year, and the current will-he-won't-he ruckus over whether Mel Smith, performing in Edinburgh as Churchill, will bow to the law and extinguish the great man's cherished cigar.So when it was announced in 2005 that the government's exam advisers, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, were planning a review of the literary content of the national curriculum as part of a wider investigation into the way in which English is taught, it was clear from the off that they would be batting on a sticky wicket. Continue reading...

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